Latest ESPN mock draft has Red Sox taking LSU’s Cade Doughty with second-round pick

In his latest 2022 mock draft for ESPN.com, Kiley McDaniel has the Red Sox taking Louisiana State University infielder Cade Doughty with their second-round pick at No. 41 overall.

The Red Sox received the 41st overall pick in this year’s draft after failing to sign 2021 second-round pick Jud Fabian out of the University of Florida.

Another SEC product, Doughty is currently regarded by Baseball America as the 56th-ranked prospect in this summer’s draft class. The 21-year-old Denham Springs native was originally selected by the Detroit Tigers in the 39th round of the 2019 amateur draft out of high school, but he opted to honor his commitment to LSU as opposed to going pro then.

In 59 games with the Bayou Bengals this season, the right-handed hitting Doughty batted .298/.393/.567 with 19 doubles, 15 home runs, 57 RBIs, 56 runs scored, four stolen bases, 29 walks, and 49 strikeouts over 282 plate appearances. He missed nearly two weeks of action from late May until early June due to a dislocated left shoulder.

Per his Baseball America scouting report, Doughty “doesn’t possess the lightning-quick bat speed seen in other high-round prospects, but more times than not, his timing is right, and his barrel stays in the zone with slight lift and proper extension. He has expanded the zone a bit more in 2022, as the punchouts increased from a year ago, with 49 in 238 at-bats. Seeing a heavy dose of plus sliders with high-velocity fastballs that the SEC has to offer, Doughty has proven in his time at Baton Rouge he can perform against the country’s top arms. When his plate discipline is on point, he is in the discussion of the upper-tier bats in this year’s class.”

Defensively, the 6-foot-2, 195-pounder saw the majority of his playing time this year come at second base while making a handful of appearances at third base and shortstop as well. Baseball America notes that “his range isn’t quite there for shortstop, but his solid-average arm is more than capable to handle third. There is room for improvement on the dirt but his athleticism and baseball IQ are enough to be hopeful that Doughty will be able to stay on the infield moving forward.” 

On the basepaths, Doughty has amassed just nine stolen bases in his three seasons at LSU. In regards to his speed, the redshirt sophomore is best described as an average runner who “will capitalize on defensive mishaps as he has throughout his career” in Baton Rouge.

Doughty, who does not turn 22 until next March, was one of 255 prospects who participated in the MLB Draft Combine in San Diego earlier this month. It is unclear if he consented to the pre-draft MRI program, which would require whichever team that drafts him to offer no less than 75% of the recommended slot value in the form of a signing bonus.

The 41st pick in this summer’s draft, for instance, has a recommended slot value of $1,905,500. So, if the Red Sox were to select Doughty in the second round, they would have to offer him at least $1,429,125 in signing bonus money or would otherwise risk losing him to free agency.

Boston has not drafted and successfully signed a player out of LSU since 2011, when it took right-handed reliever Matty Ott in the 13th round.

(Picture of Cade Doughty: Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)

Latest MLB Pipeline mock draft links Red Sox to University of Florida outfielder Sterlin Thompson

In his latest 2022 mock draft for MLB Pipeline, MLB.com’s Jim Callis writes that the Red Sox will more than likely “wind up with a college outfielder” with the 24th overall pick in the first round.

While Callis links University of Tennessee teammates Jordan Beck and Drew Gilbert to the Sox, he also suggests that the club “could have interest in” University of Florida outfielder Sterlin Thompson.

Thompson, who turns 21 on Sunday, is currently regarded by MLB Pipeline as the 27th-ranked prospect in this year’s draft class. With the Gators this season, the left-handed hitting sophomore batted .354/.443/.563 with 16 doubles, two triples, 11 home runs, 51 RBIs, 59 runs scored, 10 stolen bases, 37 walks, and 47 strikeouts over 66 games and 305 plate appearances.

On the other side of the ball, Thompson logged 44 games in right field this year. The 6-foot-4, 200 pounder also appeared in 26 contests as a second baseman for the first time in his collegiate career.

Per his MLB Pipeline scouting report, Thompson “has long shown a good feel to hit from the left side of the plate with a very good approach. He can use the whole field and drive the ball to the gaps, rarely missing a fastball, though he struggles a bit more with softer stuff.”

Defensively, it noted that “most scouts feel an outfield corner is his best long-term home at the next level. Wherever he plays, it’s his left-handed bat that will carry him and potentially get him drafted in the top three rounds.”

The Red Sox have an extensive history when it comes to drafting players out of Gainesville. Last year alone, they took fellow outfielder and Ocala, Fla. native Jud Fabian in the second round and catcher Nathan Hickey in the fifth round. Fabian may not have signed with Boston, but Hickey has since emerged as arguably the top catching prospect in the organization.

The recommended slot value for the 24th overall pick in this year’s draft comes in at roughly $2.975 million. Because Thompson participated in the MLB Draft Combine earlier this month and presumably took part in the pre-draft MRI program, he would have to receive a signing bonus offer of at least 75% of the slot value of his pick.

So, if the Red Sox were to take someone like Thompson at No. 24, they could offer him no less than $2,231,175 in signing bonus money. According to Baseball America, if this requirement is not met, “players would become free agents and teams would not receive a supplemental pick during the following year.”

On that note, the 2022 MLB Draft gets underway in Los Angeles on July 17. So it begins three weeks from Sunday.

(Picture of Sterlin Thompson: Samuel Lewis/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Red Sox host Texas A&M commit Stanley Tucker for pre-draft workout in San Diego

The Red Sox held a pre-draft workout at the University of San Diego’s Fowler Park over the weekend and junior college prospect Stanley Tucker was among those in attendance, per his Twitter account.

Tucker, 20, is currently committed to transfer and play Division I college baseball at Texas A&M University. This past season with New Mexico Junior College, the right-handed hitting infielder batted .407/.487/.785 with 20 doubles, five triples, 17 home runs, 90 RBIs, 82 runs scored, 37 stolen bases, 34 walks, and 36 strikeouts over 58 games (262 plate appearances) en route to being named a 2022 NJCAA First Team All-American.

A native of Richmond, Texas, Tucker is not regarded by industry publications such as Baseball America or MLB Pipeline as one of the top prospects in this year’s draft class. That being said, Baseball America noted back in December that at 5-foot-9 and 155 pounds, Tucker “is a little undersized but has plus speed and makes consistent hard contact.”

Defensively, Tucker is listed an an infielder who has plenty of experience up the middle, but he played some center field this year as well. He also pitched in high school, so his arm strength could be considered a plus tool depending on what evaluators have seen.

In last year’s 20-round amateur draft, the Red Sox selected two junior college products in Reedley College infielder B.J. Vela and Chipola College right-hander Luis Guerrero, who were taken in the the 16th and 17th round, respectively. Boston also signed Western Oklahoma State College righty Jhonny Felix as an undrafted free agent.

The Red Sox do have a connection to Stanley’s alma mater in Nick Pivetta, who is currently the only active major-leaguer who played for the Thunderbirds. The 29-year-old hurler was originally selected by the Nationals in the fourth round of the 2013 draft out of New Mexico Junior College.

(Picture of Stanley Tucker via his Instagram)

Should Red Sox consider taking Oregon State outfielder Jacob Melton with top pick in this year’s draft?

With the 2022 MLB Draft fast approaching, the Red Sox continue to be linked to college outfielders in recently-published mock drafts from industry experts.

MLB.com’s Jim Callis, for instance, has the Red Sox taking University of Tennessee outfielder Drew Gilbert with their top pick in his latest mock that was released on Wednesday night.

Last week, Baseball America’s Carlos Collazo had Boston selecting University of California, Berkeley outfielder Dylan Beavers with the 24th overall pick.

Needless to say, there seems to be some speculation within the industry that chief baseball officer Chaim Bloom and Co. could be leaning towards taking a college bat when the Red Sox are first on the clock on July 17.

Taking that into consideration, Oregon State outfielder Jacob Melton should probably be viewed as a potential Red Sox target as well. In fact, Collazo wrote that the Oregon native “is being scouted throughout the back of the first round.”

Melton, 21, is currently regarded by Baseball America and MLB Pipeline as the 25th- and 54th-ranked prospect in this year’s draft class, respectively.

In 60 games with the Beavers (who are currently in the super regionals of the College World Series) this season, the left-handed hitting junior batted a stout .360/.422/.668 with 21 doubles, four triples, 16 home runs, 81 RBIs, 65 runs scored, 21 stolen bases, 24 walks, and 47 strikeouts over 282 plate appearances en route to being named the Pac-12 Conference’s Player of the Year.

Per his Baseball America scouting report, Melton’s “production is prettier than his swing, which is described as ‘unorthodox’ and features plenty of moving parts. He starts with an open stance and features a leg kick in his load, with a long load that includes a barrel dump on the back half and an arm bar. Despite those mechanics, Melton has plenty of bat speed and the athleticism to make it work. While his bat path might not be ideal, his barrel stays in the zone for a long time and he has the strength to drive the ball with authority, with a frame that suggests more could be coming.”

MLB Pipeline, on the other hand, notes that the 6-foot-3, 208 pounder “has the chance to do some damage from the left side of the plate. He has an advanced approach at the plate and makes a ton of contact. He also has a good amount of juice to his pull side, and he’s tapped into that power even more in 2022, leading some scouts to think he might have better than average pop in the future.”

Defensively, Melton has moved from first base to the outfield over the course of his collegiate career and has now established himself as Oregon State’s everyday center fielder. Baseball America labels his arm strength as average while MLB Pipeline indicates that he is capable of playing all three outfield positions given his plus speed, which also helps him on the basepaths.

Melton, who turns 22 in September, is projected to go to the Giants at No. 30 by Collazo and to the Astros at No. 28 by Callis. The recommended slot value for both of this picks ($2.485 million and 2.62 million, respectively) is a bit lower than the $2,974,900 attached to the Red Sox’ first-round selection.

Because of this difference, the Sox could look to cut an underslot deal with Melton if they were to take him at No. 24, though that remains to be seen for a number of reasons.

Boston last used a first-rounder on an Oregon State player in 2005, when speedy outfielder Jacoby Jacoby Ellsbury was selected with the 23rd overall pick. Unlike Ellsbury at that time, though, Melton has never been drafted before.

(Picture of Jacob Melton: Zac BonDurant/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Latest mock draft has Red Sox selecting Vanderbilt commit Ryan Clifford with second-round pick

When the Red Sox failed to sign University of Florida outfielder Jud Fabian in the wake of last summer’s amateur draft, they were rewarded with the 41st overall pick in this year’s draft.

The 41st pick will be made shortly after the Dodgers kick off the second round and Day 2 of the 2022 MLB Draft in Los Angeles on July 18. The selection has a recommended slot value of $1,905,500, which accounts for approximately 23.6% of Boston’s $8,078,300 bonus pool.

With that, chief baseball officer Chaim Bloom and Co. could go a number of different directions when it comes to the Sox’ second-round pick. They could target a college outfielder as they did last year or perhaps even a high schooler.

In his latest mock draft for Prospects Live, Joe Doyle has the Red Sox taking Pro5 Baseball Academy outfielder Ryan Clifford with their second-round selection at No. 41 overall.

Clifford, who turns 19 next month, is currently regarded by MLB Pipeline as the No. 68 prospect in this year’s draft class. Baseball America lists the North Carolina native as its 77th-ranked draft-eligible prospect.

Listed at 6-foot-3 and 206 pounds, Clifford is committed to play college baseball at Vanderbilt University. The left-handed hitting, left-handed throwing outfielder has long been in the spotlight while playing for USA Baseball at several different levels.

Per his MLB Pipeline scouting report, Clifford “is equipped to hit for average and power” on account of his “picturesque” left-handed swing. “He has an advanced approach at the plate, focusing on driving balls from gap to gap while rarely chasing pitches out of the strike zone. With his bat speed and the strength in his 6-foot-3 frame, he could provide 25-30 homers per year once he starts driving the ball in the air more regularly. ”

Baseball America, on the other hand, notes that Clifford “developed a strong reputation as a hitter by playing up throughout his travel ball career and developing a solid track record with power potential in a strong, 6-foot-3, 206-pound frame. He’ll need to hit, as he has an offensive-forward corner profile and limited supplemental tools.”

On the other side of the ball, Clifford can best be described as a below-average runner with fringy speed who is “committed to working on his quickness and defense.” In addition to the outfield, the 18-year-old has experience at first base and could either settle there or in a corner outfield position in the long-run.

Because of these traits, Clifford has drawn comparisons to Diamondbacks first baseman Seth Beer, who was originally selected by the Astros in the first round of the 2018 amateur draft. The Red Sox had a chance to draft Beer, but instead took another first baseman in Triston Casas two picks prior.

(Picture of Ryan Clifford via his Instagram)

Latest mock draft links Red Sox to James Madison University outfielder Chase DeLauter

In his latest 2022 mock draft for Prospects Live, Joe Doyle has the Red Sox selecting University of Tennessee outfielder Jordan Beck with their top pick at No. 24 overall.

That is nothing new, as Beck has been connected to the Sox in past mock drafts. What does stick out here, though, is that Doyle links Boston to California’s Dylan Beavers and James Madison University outfielder Chase DeLauter.

“Dylan Beavers and Chase DeLauter are worth monitoring here,” writes Doyle, “the latter being one of the best players left on the board and a guy the Red Sox got a ton of lengthy looks at while on the Cape in 2021.”

DeLauter, 20, is currently regarded by Baseball America as the No. 18 prospect and by MLB Pipeline as the No. 19 prospect in this year’s draft class.

Playing for the Orleans Firebirds of the Cape Cod Baseball League last summer, DeLauter opened some eyes by slashing .298/.397/.589 to go along with a league-leading nine home runs and 21 RBIs in 34 games.

With the Dukes this season, the left-handed hitting junior batted .437/.576/.828 with eight doubles, one triple, eight homers, 35 RBIs, 31 runs scored, 10 stolen bases, 28 walks, and 21 strikeouts over 24 games spanning 118 plate appearances. His season ended in early April when he sustained a broken left foot after sliding into second base on a double.

Per his Baseball America scouting report, the West Virginia native “has plenty of strength … that gives him plus raw power and while his swing isn’t described as fluid, he gets himself into good hitting position consistently. He’s uniquely athletic for his size and has posted double-plus run times in the 60-yard dash.”

MLB Pipeline, on the other hand, notes that DeLauter “could be a middle-of-the-order type of hitter. He’s put up gaudy numbers at JMU, beating up the pitching in the mid-major Colonial Athletic Conference. He has at least plus raw power and even though there’s a little drift to his lower half that causes him to be more of a front-foot hitter at times, he’s so big and strong he can still out-leverage pitching.”

Defensively, DeLauter possesses the kind of speed that has allowed him to stay in center field to this point, though most evaluators view the 6-foot-4, 235 pounder as a future corner outfielder given his size and power profile. His arm strength is to be reckoned with as well on account of his past experience as a pitcher.

If DeLauter, who turns 21 in October, were to fall to the Red Sox at No. 24 on July 17, he would become the first college outfielder the club used a first-round pick on since Andrew Benintendi, whom they took out of the University of Arkansas in 2015.

The recommended slot value for the 24th overall pick in this year’s draft, which will take place in Los Angeles, comes in at roughly $2.975 million.

Besides Beavers, Beck, and DeLauter, other college outfielders who have been linked to the Red Sox include Tennessee’s Drew Gilbert and Stanford’s Brock Jones.

(Picture of Chase DeLauter: James Madison University Athletics)

Red Sox pitching prospect Hunter Dobbins makes professional debut for Low-A Salem

Nearly 11 months after getting drafted, Red Sox pitching prospect Hunter Dobbins made his professional debut for Low-A Salem on Sunday night.

Pitching in front of 2,017 spectators at Carillion Clinic Field, the right-hander got the start and allowed two earned runs on four hits, one walk, and one strikeout over three innings of work in Salem’s 7-4 win over the Columbia Fireflies.

After retiring six of the first eight batters he faced, Dobbins gave up three straight hits — two of which produced runs — to begin things in the top half of the third. Following a brief mound visit from Salem pitching coach Nick Green, he bounced back by fanning Carter Jensen and getting Guillermo Quintana to hit into an inning-ending double play.

Of the 45 pitches Dobbins threw on Sunday, 30 went for strikes and five of those were whiff-inducing. The 22-year-old now owns an ERA of 6.00 and will likely start again for Salem in its next series against the Charleston RiverDogs later this week.

The Red Sox originally selected Dobbins in the eighth round of last year’s amateur draft out of Texas Tech University and signed the native Texan for $197,500.

One of the primary reasons Dobbins fell to the eighth round was because the righty had just undergone Tommy John surgery in March, which resulted in him missing the entirety of his junior season with the Red Raiders.

As a sophomore during the COVID-shortened 2020 campaign, Dobbins posted a 1.35 ERA and 1.10 WHIP with 25 strikeouts to just five walks over six appearances (three starts) spanning 20 innings pitched.

Per his SoxProspects.com scouting report, the 6-foot-2, 185 pounder throws from a three-quarters arm slot and — prior to going under the knife — operated with a four-pitch mix that consisted of a 91-94 mph fastball that reached 98 mph, a 77-79 mph curveball, a circle changeup that evolved from a split-fingered change, and a slider.

Dobbins, who turns 22 in August, is not yet regarded as one of the top pitching prospects in Boston’s farm system. He was, however, identified by FanGraphs back in March as “enviable bullpen depth” given his ability to miss bats with both his curveball and changeup in college.

With that being said, SoxProspects.com notes that Dobbins still has a “wide range of outcomes” when it comes to his career outlook on account of the uncertainty surrounding what kind of pitcher he will be post-Tommy John.

If he can pitch similarly to the way he did in 2021, though, Dobbins represents another intriguing addition for the Red Sox’ minor-league pitching pipeline.

(Picture of Hunter Dobbins courtesy of the Salem Red Sox)

2022 MLB Draft prospect Tucker Toman works out for Red Sox in Greenville

The Red Sox hosted Hammond School (Columbia, S.C.) infielder Tucker Toman for a pre-draft workout at Fluor Field in Greenville on Saturday, according to SportsTalk Media Network.

Toman, 18, is the son of current Middle Tennessee State baseball coach Jim Toman. He is also currently regarded by MLB Pipeline as the No. 42 draft-eligible prospect and by Baseball America as the No. 70 prospect in this year’s draft class.

A switch-hitter, Toman batted .487 and slugged .887 with seven home runs and 27 RBIs in his senior season with the Skyhawks. The South Carolina native is committed to play his college baseball at the esteemed Louisiana State University, but he is expected to go pro this summer.

Per his MLB Pipeline scouting report, “Toman shows better bat speed with his left-handed stroke but is proficient from both sides of the plate. He understands his swing and barrels balls with ease when he just concentrates on making hard contact to all fields. He got too aggressive and pull-happy at times last summer but has the hittability, bat speed and strength for at least average and perhaps plus power without swinging for the fences.”

Baseball America, on the other hand, notes that Toman “has impressive power potential as a switch-hitter and is an offensive-oriented infielder who had an up-and-down summer. At his best, Toman barreled the baseball and sprayed line drives and deep fly balls all over the field, but he also had events where he swung and missed consistently and got himself out with bad chases on pitches out of the zone.”

Defensively, the 6-foot-1, 190 pounder is described by MLB Pipeline as a player with an uncertain future given that he only has below-average speed and average arm strength.

“The best-case scenario would be third base, where his arm and hands might be a little light but he has the work ethic to possibly make it to happen,” Toman’s scouting report reads. “Second base seems like a bigger stretch with his lack of quickness, and he could wind up on an outfield corner.”

Toman, who turns 19 in November, could very well be someone the Red Sox target in the second round as opposed to the first in this year’s amateur draft, which begins in Los Angeles on July 17.

Boston owns the 24th and 41st overall picks in the 2022 draft. They also own the 79th overall selection, which they received as compensation for losing Eduardo Rodriguez to the Tigers in free agency.

While it remains to be seen just how interested the Red Sox are in a prospect such as Toman, it is somewhat intriguing that this information got out there.

(Picture of Tucker Toman via his Instagram)

Latest MLB Pipeline mock draft has Red Sox selecting Stanford University outfielder Brock Jones with top pick

In his latest 2022 mock draft for MLB.com, MLB Pipeline’s Jim Callis has the Red Sox taking Stanford University outfielder Brock Jones with their top pick at No. 24 overall.

Jones, 21, is regarded by MLB Pipeline as the 31st-ranked prospect in this year’s draft class. In 52 games for the Cardinal this regular season, the left-handed hitting junior batted a stout .328/.464/.682 with nine doubles, five triples, 17 home runs, 46 RBIs, 63 runs scored, 14 stolen bases, 47 walks, and 58 strikeouts over 252 plate appearances.

A native of Fresno, Calif., Jones began his collegiate career as a two-sport athlete who played both football and baseball. As a safety who was limited to special teams duties as a freshman, the 6-foot, 197 pounder gave up football to solely focus on baseball beginning in 2021.

Since he used to play safety, it should come as no surprise that — per his MLB Pipeline scouting report — Jones “has good reads and routes to give him a chance to play center field long-term, though his arm is fringy at best from the outfield.”

The majority of Jones’ playing time this year has come in center field, though he does have prior experience in left field as well.

At the plate, MLB Pipeline notes that Jones has “always swung and missed a fair amount,” which has kept him from getting to his power at times. Still, with a sturdy frame that is just about maxed out at this point, Jones possesses intriguing speed and heads-up instincts, making him a threat on the basepaths.

Jones, who does not turn 22 until next March, has drawn comparisons to fellow left-handed hitter and California native Joc Pederson due to his slugging abilities. There is some concern about his offensive profile moving forward, but the athleticism and raw tools are certainly there.

Because of what he offers, Jones is projected to be taken in the first round of this year’s amateur draft, which gets underway in Los Angeles on July 17. The recommended slot value for the 24th overall selection comes in at roughly $2.975 million.

In addition to Jones, the Red Sox have been linked to other college outfielders such as UC Berkeley’s Dylan Beavers and University of Tennessee teammates Jordan Beck and Drew Gilbert in other mock drafts.

(Picture of Brock Jones: Douglas Stringer/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Latest mock draft has Red Sox taking University of California outfielder Dylan Beavers with top pick

In his first mock draft of the year for Bleacher Report, Joel Reuter has the Red Sox taking University of California, Berkeley outfielder Dylan Beavers with their top pick at No. 24 overall in the first round.

The Red Sox, Reuter writes, “have long shown a willingness to bet on upside, and Beavers could be one of the better power bats in the class.”

Beavers, who turns 21 in August, is currently regarded by Baseball America as the 38th-ranked prospect in this year’s draft class. Coming into play on Friday, the left-handed hitting junior has batted .292/.423/.651 with 16 doubles, three triples, 16 home runs, 48 RBIs, 55 runs scored, seven stolen bases, 45 walks, and 48 strikeouts over 51 games (248 plate appearances) this season for the Golden Bears.

Defensively, Beavers has seen all of his playing time this season come in right field. The 6-foot-4, 206 pounder has registered two outfield assists and three errors thus far, which is good for a .972 fielding percentage.

Per his Baseball America scouting report, Beavers possesses a solid base of tools and has a projectable frame “that should add more strength and raw power.” In regards to his defense, it notes that the 20-year-old has played “center field in the past… but profiles better in a corner at the next level.”

While there is a lot to like about Beavers’ game, some concerns arose last summer as he struggled while playing in both the Cape Cod Baseball League and for Team USA’s collegiate national team. As noted by Baseball America “some scouts thought his swing stiffened up over the summer and a lowering of his back elbow has created some inconsistencies” in his approach.

That being said, Beavers still has plenty of intriguing potential, which is precisely why the California native is projected to go in the first round of this year’s draft on July 17 in Los Angeles.

The recommended slot value for the 24th overall pick in the 2022 amateur draft comes in at roughly $2.975 million. The Red Sox last used a first-round selection on a college outfielder in 2015, when they took Andrew Benintendi at No. 7 out of the University of Arkansas.

Besides Beavers, Boston has been linked to other college outfielders such as Tennessee’s Jordan Beck and Drew Gilbert in recent mock drafts.

(Picture of Dylan Beavers: Zac BonDurant/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)